Etiketler

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Moreover, you can find other parts of my advices for TV series of different genres here, and here.

 

I am looking forward to your comments…

 

“100 wonderful movies to watch before you die” is the first part of my movie advice list. You can check it out here.

 

The second part of the list is here.

 

The third part of the list is here.

 

Totally, you can choose and enjoy from a list of nearly 250 long-living movies.

 

My blog posts are mainly Turkish, but if you are interested, you can find many English posts for infographics about different interesting subjects here, and catchy smart phone applications here, and super fun marketing videos here.

 

Enjoy:)

 

The Following:

Not: [B-]

1.The Following

The Following is an American television drama series, which premiered on Fox on January 21, 2013 about an FBI agent trying to catch a serial killer and his murderous cult. The series was created by Kevin Williamson and is jointly produced by Outerbanks Entertainment and Warner Bros. Television. The first season consisted of 15 episodes.

On March 4, 2013, the series was renewed for a second season, which will consist of 15 episodes.

Premise

The Following centers on former FBI agent Ryan Hardy (Kevin Bacon) and his attempts to recapture serial killer Joe Carroll (James Purefoy) following the latter’s escape from prison. Hardy soon discovers that the charismatic Carroll has surrounded himself with a group of like-minded individuals (which he met while teaching and while in prison), and turned them into a cult of fanatical killers. When Carroll’s son Joey (Kyle Catlett) is abducted by his father’s followers, the FBI discover that it is the first step in a wider plan for Carroll to escape custody, humiliate Hardy, and murder his ex-wife Claire (Natalie Zea).

The Following
The Following intertitle.png
Genre Drama
Thriller
Created by Kevin Williamson
Starring
Composer(s) John Frizzell
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 1
No. of episodes 8 (List of episodes)
Production
Executiveproducer(s)
Producer(s) Rebecca Dameron
Michael Stricks
Editor(s) Rob Seidenglanz
Location(s) New York City, New York
Cinematography David Tuttman
Camera setup Single camera
Productioncompany(s)
Broadcast
Original channel Fox
Original run January 21, 2013 – present

Da Vinci’s Demons:

Not: [A+]

15.Da Vinci's Demons

Da Vinci’s Demons is a US/UK drama television series about Leonardo da Vinci’s fictional early life as an artist, inventor, idealist and a genius intellectual, which premiered on Fox and Starz networks. The series was conceived and written by David S. Goyer and developed and produced by the BBC’s Adjacent Productis and filmed at Bay Studios in Neath, Port Talbot and Swansea in Wales.

Eight episodes of the series have been commissioned by Starz, with the series premiering on April 12, 2013.

On April 17, 2013 Starz Network commissioned Da Vinci’s Demons for a second season to be broadcast in 2014. Goyer has announced that Marvel comicbook writers Jonathan Hickman (Avengers) and Matt Fraction (Hawkeye) have been hired to write two episodes for the second season.

Summary:

Described as a historical fantasy, the fantasy series explores the untold story of da Vinci “inventing” the future at the age of 25, at a time in history when “thought and faith are controlled…as one man fights to set knowledge free.” The young da Vinci struggles with his inner darkness “tortured by a gift of superhuman genius. He is a heretic intent on exposing the lies of religion. An insurgent seeking to subvert an elitist society. A bastard son who yearns for legitimacy with his father.” The series includes many of the real da Vinci inventions and subsequent work as a military engineer for the Duke of Milan and later on the Borgias. The events also contain a mystic who calls himself “Child of Earth”, that guides da Vinci in unlocking the hidden areas of his mind by accessing the Fountain of Memory, related to Noetic theory, Akashic Records, ancient stories found in Mímisbrunnr, Old Norse “the rememberer, wise one”, the “32nd Path” of the Kabbala “Tree of Life”[9], Celtic religions and the Upanishads. The mytharc is formed when Da Vinci’s character becomes involved with a quest for the Book of Leaves and the mystery cult known as the Sons of Mithras. Entwined together are da Vinci’s brutally antagonistic relationship with his father, who works for the Medicis, the shadowy wars of secret societies, the dangerous romance with an undercover spy and the political schemes of Florence and Milan fighting for power. Medieval backdrops are combined with hi-tech CGI to visualize da Vinci’s intense imagination, eidetic memory and thought processes, with a scientific step by step monologue sometimes paired with slow-motion and rotoscoping blueprints.

Main Cast:

  • Tom Riley as Leonardo da Vinci
  • Laura Haddock as Lucrezia Donati, the mistress of Lorenzo Medici and lover of Leonardo da Vinci.
  • Blake Ritson as Count Girolamo Riario
  • Elliot Cowan as Lorenzo Medic
  • Allan Corduner as Andrea Verrocchio
  • Lara Pulver as Clarice Orsini, Lorenzo Medici’s seductive and politically-minded wife.
  • Gregg Chillin as Zoroaster
  • Hera Hilmar as Vanessa
  • Eros Vlahos as Nico
  • James Faulkner as Pope Sixtus IV
  • Tom Bateman as Giuliano Medici
  • Alexander Siddig as Al-Rahim
  • Paul Westwood as Niccolò Ardinghelli
  • Jan Erik Madsen as Zircher
  • James Bryhan as Noble
Da Vinci’s Demons
The series' logo.
The series’ logo.
Genre Adventure
Drama
Historical fantasy
Created by David S. Goyer
Starring Tom Riley
Laura Haddock
Blake Ritson
Elliot Cowan
Lara Pulver
Composer(s) Bear McCreary
Country of origin United States
United Kingdom
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 1
No. of episodes 4 (List of episodes)
Production
Executiveproducer(s) David S. Goyer
Julie Gardner
Jane Tranter
Producer(s) Lee Morris[1]
Editor(s) Tim Murrell
Location(s) Neath Port TalbotWales
Cinematography Julian Court
Camera setup Multiple
Running time 60 mins.
Productioncompany(s) Phantom Four Films
Adjacent
Distributor Tonto Films and Television Limited
Broadcast
Original channel Starz
Original run April 12, 2013[2] – present

Spartacus:

Not: [A-]

2.1.Spartacus Blood and Sand2.2.Spartacus Gods of the Arena

Spartacus is an American television series that premiered on Starz on January 22, 2010. The series was inspired by the historical figure of Spartacus, a Thracian gladiator who from 73 to 71 BC led a major slave uprising against the Roman Republic. Executive producers Steven S. DeKnight and Robert Tapert focused on structuring the events of Spartacus’ obscure early life leading up to the beginning of historical records. The show has been rated TV-MA for graphic violence, strong sexual content, and coarse language.

After the completion of the first season titled Spartacus: Blood and Sand, production for another season was delayed because lead actor Andy Whitfield was diagnosed with early-stage non-Hodgkin lymphoma so Starz produced a six-episode prequel mini-series entitled Spartacus: Gods of the Arena. When the actor’s cancer recurred and he later died on September 11, 2011,Starz had actor Liam McIntyre for the role of Spartacus in the second season titled Spartacus: Vengeance. On June 4, 2012, Starz announced the third and final season, titled Spartacus: War of the Damned.

Plot

Blood and Sand

The story begins with an unnamed Thracian’s involvement in a unit of Roman auxiliary in a campaign against the Getae (Dacian tribes that occupied the regions of the Lower Danube, in what today is Bulgaria and Romania) under the command of the legatus, Claudius Glaber. In 72-71 BC, Roman general Marcus Terentius Varro Lucullus, proconsul of the Roman province of Macedonia, marched against the Getae, who were allies of Rome’s enemy, Mithridates VI of Pontus. The Getae frequently raid the Thracians’ lands, so the Thracians are persuaded by Glaber to enlist in the Romans’ service as auxiliaries. Glaber is persuaded by his wife Ilithyia to seek greater glory, decides to break off attacking the Getae and directly confront the forces of Mithridates in Asia Minor. The Thracian, feeling betrayed, leads a mutiny against Glaber, and returns to find his village destroyed. The Thracian and his wife Sura are captured by Glaber the next day; the Thracian is condemned to die in the gladiator arena for his crime, while Sura is taken away, condemned to slavery. The Thracian is shipped to Capua in Italy, a center of gladiator training. Against all odds in the arena he slays the four gladiators appointed to execute him and becomes an instant sensation with the crowd. Senator Albinius commutes the punishment from death to slavery. The prisoner’s true name unknown, Lentulus Batiatus, the owner of a ludus in Capua, suggests to name him “Spartacus”, because he fought like the ferocious Thracian king of that name.

Noting well the Thracian’s fierce raw talent and popularity with the masses, Batiatus purchases him for training within the walls of his ludus under the tutelage of Doctore, a former gladiator and fellow slave. He is befriended by Varro, a Roman who sold himself into slavery in order to pay his debts and support his family. He is harassed by more senior gladiators, notably Crixus, an undefeated Gaul, and Barca, a Carthaginian. Spartacus soon learns that Sura was sold to a Syrian slave trader. Batiatus, who has been unable to control Spartacus during his first days of training, promises to find Sura and reunite them in exchange for the promising neophyte’s cooperation in the arena.

After many near-fatal ordeals and much further training Spartacus attains the status of a living legend and is named the “Champion of Capua”. Batiatus arranges the purchase of Sura, but she is delivered mortally wounded, supposedly having been waylaid by bandits en route. Her murder was secretly ordered by Batiatus to keep Spartacus loyal and focused. Spartacus casts off his heritage as a Thracian and forgets his dream of freedom, becoming content with life as champion.

The turning point comes when Spartacus is set to fight his only friend in the ludus, Varro, in an exhibition match celebrating the coming to manhood of the Capuan magistrate’s son, Numerius. Ilithyia, who has hated Spartacus since he embarrassed her husband Glaber by his mutiny, seduces the young man and convinces him to demand death for the loser of the match. Spartacus wins (as expected), and when the young man gives the “thumbs down”, Batiatus, wishing to ingratiate himself with the boy’s powerful father, forces Spartacus to comply and kill Varro. While suffering from both his wound in this match and his remorse and sorrow over having to kill his friend, Spartacus has fever dreams that lead him to discover that Batiatus arranged Sura’s death. Knowing that it is all or nothing when it comes to resistance of his enslavement, he resolves to “kill them all” and lead a revolt against the ruling house he once fought for.

In order to get his revenge, Spartacus enlists the help of Crixus and the rest of the gladiators to defeat the house of Batiatus once and for all. A battle to the death between Crixus and Spartacus is arranged for the Capuan elite at the ludus. Doctore (whom Batiatus refers to by his real name, Oenomaus) confronts Batiatus about Barca’s death and Ashur’s hand in it. Spartacus gains support from Mira who is tasked with opening the gate to the villa from the training area. Crixus resists aiding Spartacus in hopes of reuniting with Naevia; however, after learning he was weakened to ensure Spartacus’ victory, at the last moment he joins with Spartacus. Doctore initially stops Spartacus from killing Batiatus. In the ensuing chaos of the gladiators killing the guards and some guests, Crixus persuades Doctore to join him with Spartacus, Illithyia escapes and has her guards seal the door to the ludus from the outside, Doctore, making good on his word, tries to kill Ashur but ends up being eluded, Crixus grievously wounds Batiatus’ wife, Lucretia, with a sword stab to her abdomen piercing her womb and killing their unborn child, Aurelia kills Numerius after revealing to him that Varro was her husband, and Spartacus finally kills Batiatus in front of the seriously wounded Lucretia. After the massacre, Spartacus vows to make “Rome tremble”.

Gods of the Arena

The mini-series features the history of the House of Batiatus and the city of Capua before the arrival of Spartacus. The main story opens not long after Quintus Lentulus Batiatus becomes lanista, manager of the House’s slaves and gladiators, when he takes over his father’s ludus.

Batiatus is quickly revealed as having grand ambitions, beginning with stepping out of his father’s shadow. As the story progresses, Batiatus continues to seek greatness for the House under hisleadership, as well as recognition for his own name. By his side stands his devoted wife, Lucretia, who is willing to help her husband achieve his goals regardless of the cost. Batiatus soon places all of his fortunes on one man whom he believes will bring fame and glory to the House of Batiatus, his best gladiator, the Celt Gannicus. Gannicus is a skilled warrior almost without equal, who wields his dual swords in the arena with great prowess. However, Batiatus’ opponents would not sit idly and allow his ascent to greatness without challenge.

Purchased as an undisciplined and disheveled recruit in the first episode, Crixus the Gaul initially endures mockery and threats of death, before eventually rising to become a gladiator of skill and fame second only to Gannicus. As Batiatus fends off repeated attempts by his professional rival Tullius to obtain Gannicus, his relationships with his father Titus and friend Solonius begin to suffer the strain of Quintus’ relentless ambition. Former champion gladiator Oenomaus reluctantly retires from combat to become Doctore, while Syrian recruits Ashur and Dagan become fierce enemies as Ashur tries to prove himself worthy of being a gladiator. Veteran gladiators Barca and Gannicus accept he rising star of Crixus but fear that their own careers will suffer, as the machinations of Batiatus and Lucretia to court Capua’s elite end in tragedy for several members of the household. Against all of this, the city’s splendid new arena nears completion and with it the opening games that will make men into gods. When the arena opens Solonius’ and Batiatus’ gladiators compete with each other, Batiatus’ gladiators prevailing in the contest. Gannicus again proves himself to be the champion of Capua and the god of the arena and by virtue of his win against Solonius’ gladiators, becomes the champion of Capua and gains his freedom.

Vengeance

After the bloody escape from the House of Batiatus that concluded Spartacus: Blood and Sand, the gladiator rebellion begins to strike fear into the heart of the Roman Republic in Spartacus: Vengeance. Praetor Claudius Glaber and his Roman troops are sent to Capua to crush Spartacus’ growing band of freed slaves before they can inflict further damage. Spartacus is given a choice between satisfying his personal need for vengeance against the man who condemned his wife to slavery and eventual death, or making the larger sacrifices necessary to keep his budding army from breaking apart.

War of the Damned

This final season of Spartacus began airing January 25, 2013 and concluded April 12, 2013. This season follows the final struggle between Spartacus and Marcus Licinius Crassus. Crassus pursues Spartacus as he struggles to feed his ever growing army of former slaves. Spartacus wins several victories against Crassus’ forces and continues to frustrate the Romans. The series culminates in a direct all out battle between Spartacus and Crassus.

Cast and characters

Romans

  • Viva Bianca (Season 1 & Season 2) as Ilithyia – the daughter of senator Albinius and wife of Glaber.
  • John Hannah (Season 1 & Prequel) as Quintus Lentulus Batiatus – a lanista and Spartacus’ master.
  • Tom Hobbs (Season 2) as Seppius – a young Capua citizen of note. He wishes to strip the honor of capturing Spartacus from Glaber.
  • Lucy Lawless (Season 1, Prequel & Season 2) as Lucretia – Batiatus’ wife.
  • Stephen Lovatt (Prequel) as Tullius – Batiatus’ business rival.
  • Hanna Mangan-Lawrence (Season 2) as Seppia – younger sister to Seppius.
  • Jaime Murray (Prequel) as Gaia – a social climber and Lucretia’s friend.
  • Craig Parker (Season 1 & Season 2) as Gaius Claudius Glaber – a Roman army legatus who is responsible for Spartacus’ enslavement as a gladiator.
  • Jeffrey Thomas (Prequel & Season 2) as Titus Lentulus Batiatus – Quintus Batiatus’ father and owner of the family’s ludus.
  • Brett Tucker (Season 2) as Publius Varinius – Glaber’s chief political rival and fellow praetor.
  • Gareth Williams (Prequel) as Vettius – Tullius’ young henchman and owner of a rival ludus.
  • Craig Walsh Wrightson (Season 1 & Prequel) as Solonius – a rival lanista and former friend to the House of Batiatus.
  • Simon Merrells (Season 3) as Marcus Licinius Crassus – the richest man in the Roman Republic. Envied and despised by the highborn among the senate, he craves the power and respect that defeating Spartacus and his rebel army would bring.
  • Todd Lasance (Season 3) as Gaius Julius Caesar – a handsome young rogue from an esteemed lineage and his deadly intelligence and skill with a sword will be brought to bear against the rebellion as he begins his ascent towards the all-powerful ruler he will one day become.
  • Anna Hutchison (Season 3) as Laeta – a privileged wife of a Roman dignitary who becomes entangled in the struggle against Spartacus. Her life and those of the ones she loves are forever changed by the conflict.

Gladiators and slaves

  • Andy Whitfield (Season 1) and Liam McIntyre (Season 2 & Season 3) as Spartacus – a Thracian slave who becomes a gladiator in the ludus of Lentulus Batiatus before leading a slave uprising
  • Manu Bennett (Season 1, Prequel, Season 2 & Season 3) as Crixus – a Gaul, he was Batiatus’ top gladiator prior to Spartacus. Love interest of Naevia, and secondary leader of the rebellion.
  • Lesley-Ann Brandt (Season 1 & Prequel) and Cynthia Addai-Robinson (Season 2 & Season 3) as Naevia – Lucretia’s personal and loyal slave. Love interest of Crixus.
  • Dustin Clare (Prequel, Season 2 & Season 3) as Gannicus – champion gladiator of the Batiatus’ ludus before the arrival of Crixus. Later, as a free man, he joins old friends in the revolt.
  • Jai Courtney (Season 1) as Varro – a Roman citizen who sold himself to the ludus to support his family.
  • Erin Cummings (Season 1 & Season 2) as Sura – the wife of Spartacus.
  • Dan Feuerriegel (Season 1, Season 2 & Season 3) as Agron – a German gladiator who was sold to Batiatus’ ludus, he was the first to join Spartacus in his revolt, where his brother Duro died. He is now one of Spartacus’ top warriors. And becomes Nasir’s lover in Season 2.
  • Antonio Te Maioha (Season 1 & Prequel) as Barca – nicknamed the “Beast of Carthage”, is one of Batiatus’ most successful gladiators, serves as a bodyguard for his master. His unexpected death midway through Season 1 is widely considered a turning point in the series.
  • Peter Mensah (Season 1, Prequel & Season 2) as Oenomaus – Batiatus’ doctore (trainer) of gladiators, and reluctant advisor to the rebels.
  • Katrina Law (Season 1 & Season 2) as Mira – a slave girl sent under threat of death to seduce Spartacus and become his lover. She takes charge of logistical matters as a leader of the rebellion.
  • Marisa Ramirez (Prequel) as Melitta – Lucretia’s personal slave and the wife of Oenomaus.
  • Nick E. Tarabay (Season 1, Prequel & Season 2) as Ashur – a Syrian former gladiator whose leg was crippled in the arena by Crixus; later served Batiatus as a bookkeeper and henchman. After surviving the fall of Batiatus, he is out for vengeance against the rebel gladiators who never accepted him as one of their own.
  • Pana Hema Taylor (Season 2 & Season 3) as Nasir – A young slave liberated from a villa by Spartacus and his army of rebels. He becomes the lover of Agron.
  • Ellen Hollman (Season 2 & Season 3) as Saxa – a German slave rescued by the rebels. She later joins the rebels.
  • Jenna Lind (Season 3) as Kore – A loyal slave to Marcus Crassus the Roman tasked to bring an end to Spartacus and his rebellion. Her deep feelings for her master will be sorely tested by spiraling events.
  • Gwendoline Taylor (Season 3) as Sibyl – A beautiful young slave rescued from Roman cruelty. Now free, she will embark on a journey.
Spartacus
Spartacus; Blood and Sand 2010 Intertitle.png
Season 1 intertitle
Genre Historical drama
Sword-and-sandal[1]
Created by Steven S. DeKnight
Developed by DeKnight Productions / Starz Originals
Starring
Composer(s) Joseph LoDuca
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 3 (+ 1 miniseries)
No. of episodes 30 (List of episodes)
Production
Executiveproducer(s)
Producer(s) Chloe Smith
Charles Knight
Aaron Lam
Editor(s) Gary Hunt
Jonathan Woodford-Robinson
Location(s) New Zealand
Cinematography Aaron Morton
Running time 53-60 minutes
Broadcast
Original channel Starz
Picture format 1080i (HDTV)
Original run January 22, 2010 – present

Pretty Little Liars:

Not: [B-]

3.Pretty Little Liars

Pretty Little Liars is an American teen drama mystery-thriller television series loosely based on the popular series of novels written by Sara Shepard. The show premiered on June 8, 2010 on ABC Family. After an initial order of 10 episodes on June 28, 2010, ABC Family ordered an additional 12 episodes for season one. These episodes began airing on January 3 and ended on March 21, 2011. The ratings success of the first 10 episodes prompted the book series to be extended beyond the initial eight novels. On November 29, 2011 ABC Family renewed the series for a third season, consisting of 24 episodes (still airing). The third season premiered on June 5, 2012 and ended on March 19, 2013.

On October 4, 2012, ABC Family renewed the show for a fourth season. Filming begins on March 15, 2013. It will premiere on June 11, 2013.

Plot

Set in the fictional town of Rosewood, Pennsylvania, the series follows the lives of Aria Montgomery (Lucy Hale), Hanna Marin (Ashley Benson),Spencer Hastings (Troian Bellisario) and Emily Fields (Shay Mitchell), four girls whose clique falls apart after the disappearance of their queen bee,Alison DiLaurentis (Sasha Pieterse). One year later they begin receiving messages from a mysterious figure using the name “A” who threatens to expose their secrets. At first they think it’s Alison herself, but after she is found dead, the girls realize that someone else knows their secrets—including long-hidden ones they thought only Alison knew. Alison was also stalked by A, and the girls continue to find more and more information about A and Alison’s disappearance – all while risking their lives.

Pretty Little Liars
PrettyLittleLiarsIntertitle.png
Genre Teen drama
Mystery
Thriller
Created by I. Marlene King (series)
Sara Shepard (novels)
Developed by I. Marlene King
Starring Troian Bellisario
Ashley Benson
Shay Mitchell
Lucy Hale
Tyler Blackburn
Ian Harding
Laura Leighton
Chad Lowe
Holly Marie Combs
Bianca Lawson
Janel Parrish
Sasha Pieterse
Opening theme Secret by The Pierces
Composer(s) Michael Suby
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 3
No. of episodes 70 (List of episodes)
Production
Executiveproducer(s) Leslie Morgenstein
Bob Levy
I. Marlene King
Oliver Goldstick
Producer(s) Lisa Cochran-Neilan
Location(s) Los AngelesCalifornia
Pilot:
VancouverBritish Columbia
Cinematography Dana Gonzales
Camera setup Red Twosingle-camera
Running time 41–45 minutes
Productioncompany(s) Warner Horizon Television
Alloy Entertainment
Long Lake Productions
Russian Hill Productions
Distributor Warner Bros. Television
Broadcast
Original channel ABC Family
Original run June 8, 2010 – present

Cult:

Not: [B+]

4.Cult

Cult is an American television series that airs on The CW. The series centers on a journalist blogger and a production assistant, who investigate a series of mysterious disappearances that are linked to a popular television series named Cult. It premiered on The CW on February 19, 2013, and originally aired on Tuesdays at 9:00 pm Eastern/8:00 pm Central.

On February 27, 2013, The CW announced that starting March 8 Cult would air on Fridays at 9:00 pm Eastern/8:00 pm Central. On April 10, 2013, Cult was removed from the schedule, effectively canceling the freshman series. The CW is yet to announce whether the remaining episodes will eventually air.

Plot

The series follows Jeff (Matthew Davis), a journalist blogger, and Skye (Jessica Lucas), a production researcher on a popular television crime series called Cult, as they investigate the fans of the series, who could be re-creating the crimes committed on the series.

Cult
Cult intertitle.png
Genre MysteryPsychological thriller

Created by Rockne S. O’Bannon
Starring Matthew DavisJessica Lucas

Composer(s) Tim Jones
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 1
No. of episodes 13 (6 unaired)(List of episodes)
Production
Executiveproducer(s) Jason EnslerJosh Schwartz

Stephanie Savage

Len Goldstein

Rockne S. O’Bannon
Producer(s) J. B. Moranville
Editor(s) Matt Barber
Location(s) Vancouver[1]
Cinematography Robert Gantz
Running time 42 minutes
Productioncompany(s) Rockne S. O’Bannon TelevisionFake Empire Productions

Distributor Warner Bros. Television Distribution
Broadcast
Original channel The CW
Original run February 19, 2013 – present

666 Park Avenue:

Not: [B-]

5.666 Park Avenue

666 Park Avenue is an American supernatural drama series, which premiered on ABC on September 30, 2012. The series was created and produced by David Wilcox, and was loosely based upon the novel of the same name by Gabriella Pierce. The show stars Rachael Taylor, Dave Annable, Vanessa Williams and Terry O’Quinn and follows a couple who learns that the Manhattan apartment building that they just moved into, including its upscale tenants, might be possessed by a mysterious demonic force.

The elaborate Beaux-Arts building located on the fashionable Upper East Side of Manhattan called “The Drake” in the series is an actual apartment building, The Ansonia in New York City.

ABC ordered the pilot on January 20, 2012, and it was picked up for a full first season of thirteen episodes on May 11, 2012. It aired on Sunday evenings at 10:00 pm Eastern/9:00 pm Central, with the series Revenge serving as its lead in. On November 16, 2012, ABC announced that the series had been canceled, but will finish its thirteen-episode run.

On December 21, 2012, ABC announced that the final four episodes of 666 Park Avenue would air the following summer, and that Happy Endingsand Don’t Trust the B—- in Apartment 23 will be shown in its place on Sundays. The final episodes were first broadcast in Spain, with broadcasts also planned in New Zealand and Australia, ahead of their original airing on ABC.

Plot

The plot of 666 Park Avenue focuses on the new co-managers of the Drake residential hotel located at 999 Park Avenue. It also centers around the other tenants in the building and the married owners of the building.

666 Park Avenue
666 Park Avenue.jpg
Genre Supernatural drama
Horror fiction
Drama
Format Serial drama
Created by Gabriella Pierce
(based on her novel)
Developed by David Wilcox
Starring Rachael Taylor
Dave Annable
Robert Buckley
Mercedes Masohn
Erik Palladino
Helena Mattsson
Samantha Logan
Vanessa Williams
Terry O’Quinn
Composer(s) Trevor Morris
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 1
No. of episodes 13 (List of episodes)
Production
Executiveproducer(s) Alex Graves
Leslie Morgenstein
Gina Girolamo
David Wilcox
Matt Miller
Producer(s) Mary Rae Thewlis
Editor(s) Russell Denove
Cinematography Anette Haellmigk
Running time 43 minutes (approx.)
Productioncompany(s) Warner Bros. Television
Alloy Entertainment
Broadcast
Original channel ABC
Picture format 480i (SDTV)
720p (HDTV)
Audio format Stereo, Dolby Digital 5.1
Original run September 30, 2012 – present

Leverage:

Not: [B+]

6.Leverage

Leverage is an American television drama series, which aired on TNT from December 7, 2008 to December 25, 2012. The series was produced by Electric Entertainment, a production company of executive producer and director Dean Devlin. Leverage follows a five-person team: a thief, a grifter, a hacker, and a retrieval specialist, led by former insurance investigator Nathan Ford, who use their skills to fight corporate and governmental injustices inflicted on ordinary citizens.

Season 1 consists of thirteen episodes, which writers John Rogers and Chris Downey and producer Dean Devlin intended to be a complete story should the series not be renewed. Season 2, for which production moved from Los Angeles to Portland, Oregon,ran in two parts: a nine-episode summer season that premiered on July 15, 2009, followed by a further six episodes the following winter. Leverage moved to Sunday for Season 3, which began June 20, 2010.

Leverage was renewed for a fourth season on July 30, 2010. It premiered on June 26, 2011, and ran for 18 episodes, ten in the summer and eight in the winter. The continuation of Season 4 began on Sunday November 27, 2011, at 9pm EST on TNT.

On August 12, 2011, Leverage was renewed for a fifth season, to be both filmed and set in Portland, Oregon. Season 5 premiered July 15, 2012.

Leverage was canceled on December 21, 2012 amid falling ratings. The final episode, which was produced as a possible series finale, aired December 25, 2012. On January 9, 2013, Leverage won Favorite Cable TV Drama at the 39th People’s Choice Awards.

Plot:

Nathan Ford is a former insurance investigator with an intricate knowledge of scams. He and his team act as modern-day Robin Hoods, staging elaborate cons for clients victimized by an individual or corporation with the wealth and influence to avoid reprisal within the legal system.

The team comes together when Victor Dubenich, a wealthy aerospace executive, persuades Ford to lead a team of talented criminals to steal back aeronautical plans allegedly stolen from him by a competitor. After a successful heist, Dubenich double-crosses them, withdrawing their payment and attempting to blow them up in an abandoned warehouse. In retaliation, the group decides to run a con on Victor, eventually exposing his corruption and implicating him in a bribery attempt, which leads to his being arrested by the FBI. When the con is complete, rather than retire, they decide to keep working for the thrill each gets doing the work they are best at, and the added bonus of how effective they are as part of an elite team. Ford’s condition for continuing is that he is allowed to select their jobs, steering them from crimes engaged in for pure profit to jobs undertaken to benefit those with a genuine need who cannot use the legal system or other “legitimate” methods to redress their grievances. Underpinning the main plot are two relationships: Nate and Sophie, whose complicated romantic relationship dates back to his days as an insurance investigator, and Parker and Hardison, whose nascent romance plays out tentatively, as they learn how to build a relationship.

The team sets up headquarters in Los Angeles, operating as Leverage Consulting & Associates, and for a time operate free of scrutiny until the arrival of Nate’s former competitor, James Sterling. With Sterling determined to take them down, they pull their most daring heist by stealing a maquette from Nate’s former boss, Ian Blackpoole. Nate’s revenge comes at a cost, and the team must disband for six months. It re-forms in Boston, Nate’s hometown, where they resume their activities, still followed by Sterling. Season two ends with the team still intact but physically separated from Ford, who surrenders to Sterling and the FBI rather than allow the team to be arrested.

As season three begins, Ford is in prison, while the team attempts to find a way to get him out, until fate intervenes in the form of a mysterious Italian woman who aids in Nate’s escape. She blackmails the team into taking down infamous and untouchable criminal figure Damien Moreau. By season’s end, the team finally brings down Moreau’s empire, and he is left imprisoned in San Lorenzo, a fictional European nation he once controlled until the team ousted the puppet regime leader.

Season four opens only days after their return from San Lorenzo, the team discovering that someone has been bugging their headquarters. They assume one of the many influential people they’ve brought down is now out for payback. Nate discovers that its really the work of a wealthy businessman named Jack Latimer. Latimer has been tracking the team’s movements since their formation in Chicago, and has found a way to profit off their good deeds. With every major company they bring down, he invests in their competitors and makes a fortune, having built a multibillion-dollar empire in the short span of their operations; now he offers to give the team intel on the evildoings of other major corporations, if they alert him in advance and give him the chance to profit on each company’s downfall. Nate, however, does not trust Latimer and refuses to associate himself and his team with Latimer, and his suspicions prove to be justified when it is revealed that Latimer is secretly working with Victor Dubenich (the team’s first victim), who is out to not only rebuild his fortune but also destroy the team.

Season Five (which turned out to be the final season) opens with Nate having the team moved to Portland, Oregon and setting up shop in a microbrewery, but the season premiere ends with the revelation that Nate is working with Hardison on a secret project which is unknown to the others. After a series of extremely intricate jobs, the secret project is revealed and the ultimate score is carried off, despite the re-appearance of perennial nemesis Sterling. However, the season’s ending episode, broadcast on Christmas Day 2012, also reveals drastic changes in the lives and dynamics of the team, but assures the audience that the con will go on.

Leverage
Leverage logo.svg
Leverage logo

Created by
Starring
Composer(s) Joseph LoDuca
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 5
No. of episodes 77 (List of episodes)
Production
Executiveproducer(s)
Producer(s) Paul Bernard
Editor(s)
  • Sonny Baskin
  • David Siegel
  • Brian Gonosey
Location(s)
Cinematography David Connell
Camera setup Gary Camp
Running time One hour (with commercials)
Productioncompany(s)
Distributor TNT
Broadcast
Original channel TNT
Picture format
Original run December 7, 2008 – December 25, 2012[1]

Awake:

Not: [B-]

7.Awake

Awake is an American television police procedural fantasy drama that originally aired on the National Broadcasting Company (NBC) for one season from March 1 to May 24, 2012. The pilot episode had an early release on Hulu on February 16, 2012, two weeks before the series’ premiere on television. The show’s central character is Michael Britten (Jason Isaacs), a detective who works for the Los Angeles Police Department. Kyle Killen, the series’ creator, was primarily responsible for the program’s concept; although he served as a writer, he avowed that writing episode scripts was difficult. Killen also served as an executive producer (with David Slade) of the pilot episode. Jeffrey Reiner and Howard Gordon then continued producing (with Killen) for Gordon’s Teakwood Lane Productions.

Michael lives in two separate realities after a car accident. In one reality (where he wears a red wristband), his wife Hannah (Laura Allen) survives the accident; in the other reality (where he wears a green wristband), his son Rex (Dylan Minnette) survives. Michael does not know which reality is “real”, and uses the wristbands to differentiate the two. He sees two therapists: Dr. Jonathan Lee (BD Wong) in the “red reality” and Dr. Judith Evans (Cherry Jones) in the “green reality”. At work, Michael’s erratic behavior triggers clashes with his team; they do not know about Michael’s uncanny ability to solve crimes using details from both realities.

Awake averaged 4.8 million viewers per episode, ranking 125th in viewership for the 2011–12 season. A critical success, Awake‘s cast was praised (particularly Isaacs’ performance as Michael). Commentators claimed that “Say Hello to My Little Friend” was the best episode of the series since “Pilot”. On May 11, after eleven of the thirteen produced episodes were aired, the show was canceled due to low ratings (although NBC aired the remaining episodes in the series’ original time slot). Fans of the show created a “Save Awake” campaign to convince networks to revive the show, which was ultimately unsuccessful. Awake has been nominated for one award.

Awake
The word AWAKE is copper-colored, with the "E" broken.
Genre Police procedural
Fantasy
Thriller
Drama
Created by Kyle Killen
Starring Jason Isaacs
Laura Allen
Steve Harris
Dylan Minnette
BD Wong
Michaela McManus
Wilmer Valderrama
Cherry Jones
Composer(s) Reinhold Heil
Johnny Klimek
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 1
No. of episodes 13 (List of episodes)
Production
Executiveproducer(s) David Slade
Kyle Killen
Howard Gordon
Jeffrey Reiner
Producer(s) Jason Isaacs
Keith Redmon
Ed Milkovich
Michael Klick
Editor(s) Paul Trejo
Nikc Berrisford
Cinematography Feliks Parnell
Camera setup Single-camera
Running time 43 minutes
Productioncompany(s) Letter Eleven
Teakwood Lane Productions
20th Century Fox Television
Broadcast
Original channel NBC
Picture format NTSC (480i)
HDTV 1080i
Audio format 5.1 Surround Sound
Original run March 1 – May 24, 2012

Missing:

Not: [B-]

8.Missing

Missing is an American mystery thriller drama television series, starring Ashley Judd, Cliff Curtis and Sean Bean. The series ran from March 15, 2012 to May 17, 2012 on ABC. ABC announced on May 17, 2011, that the series would air as a midseason replacement in 2012. Ten episodes were ordered for the first season. ABC canceled the series on May 11, 2012.The show was nominated for 2 Emmy awards in 2012. One for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie (Ashley Judd) and the other for Outstanding Music Composition for a Miniseries, Movie or a Special.

Plot

The series follows Rebecca “Becca” Winstone (Ashley Judd), a widow and retired CIA agent with an 18-year-old son, Michael (Nick Eversman). In 2001, when Becca and her husband Paul Winstone (Sean Bean) were active CIA agents, he was killed in a car bombing witnessed by their son. In the pilot episode, Michael informs his mother that he has been accepted to a summer architecture program in Rome, Italy. Becca, who now lives an ordinary life running a florist shop, is hesitant to let him go but gives in. After not hearing from him for over a week and receiving a call from the architecture school informing her that Michael has moved out of his dorm room, Becca travels to Rome to track him down; but she finds herself in the middle of an international conspiracy involving the CIA and an Interpol agent who was once her lover.

Missing
Missing promo Titlecard.jpg
Genre Mystery
Action
Espionage
Created by Gregory Poirier
Starring Ashley Judd
Cliff Curtis
Sean Bean
Adriano Giannini
Nick Eversman
Tereza Voříšková
Composer(s) Robert Duncan
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 1
No. of episodes 10 (List of episodes)
Production
Executive producer(s) Ashley Judd
Gina Matthews
Gregory Poirier
Grant Scharbo
Stephen Shill
Matthew Stillman
Producer(s) Gideon Amir
David Minkowski
Editor(s) Nick Arthurs
Allan Lee
Simon Webb
Cinematography Arthur Albert
Camera setup Multi-camera
Running time 43 minutes
Productioncompany(s) Upcountry Productions
Little Engine Productions
Stillking Films
Distributor ABC Studios
Broadcast
Original channel ABC
Original run March 15 – May 17, 2012

Ringer:

Not: [B+]

9.Ringer

Ringer is an American television series that premiered on the CW on September 13, 2011. The series stars Sarah Michelle Gellar, who plays twin sisters Bridget Kelly and Siobhan Martin. On May 13, 2011, it was reported that the project had been picked up to series by The CW. On October 12, 2011, The CW ordered a full first season of 22 episodes. On May 11, 2012, The CW announced the cancellation of Ringer.

Series synopsis

Bridget Kelly (Sarah Michelle Gellar) is a recovering drug addict and stripper in Wyoming. She is under the protection of FBI Agent Victor Machado (Nestor Carbonell), having agreed to testify against her employer, local crime boss Bodaway Macawi (Zahn McClarnon), who she witnessed committing murder. Fearing that Macawi, who has already murdered several witnesses linking him to previous crimes, will also kill her, Bridget flees to New York to meet her estranged twin sister Siobhan (also played by Gellar).

Soon after arriving in New York, Siobhan, who had kept her sister’s existence secret from her family, appears to commit suicide by jumping into the ocean. Bridget then assumes Siobhan’s identity and tries to fit in among Siobhan’s wealthy social circle, including Siobhan’s husband Andrew (Ioan Gruffudd), stepdaughter Juliet (Zoey Deutch), best friend Gemma (Tara Summers), and Gemma’s husband Henry (Kristoffer Polaha) with whom Siobhan had been having an affair. The only one who knows that Bridget is passing as Siobhan is Bridget’s Narcotics Anonymous sponsor Malcolm (Mike Colter). Bridget’s life becomes more complicated as she discovers that her sister was hiding secrets of her own and that someone is trying to kill Siobhan as well.

Ringer
RingerOpening.jpg
Genre Thriller
Drama
Neo-noir
Mystery
Created by Eric Charmelo
Nicole Snyder
Starring Sarah Michelle Gellar
Kristoffer Polaha
Ioan Gruffudd
Nestor Carbonell
Mike Colter
Theme music composer Gabriel Mann
Composer(s) Gabriel Mann(episodes 1–4)
Mark Snow (episodes 5–22)
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 1
No. of episodes 22 (List of episodes)
Production
Executiveproducer(s) James Bigwood
Rachel Kaplan
Sarah Michelle Gellar
Eric Charmelo
Nicole Snyder
Richard Shepard
Jon Liebman
Joanne Colonna
Peter Traugott
Pam Veasey
Running time 40 minutes
Productioncompany(s) Green Eggs and Pam Productions, Inc.
Brillstein Entertainment Partners
ABC Studios
Warner Bros. Television
CBS Television Studios (pilot only)
CBS Productions (series)
Broadcast
Original channel The CW
First shown in United States
Original run September 13, 2011 – April 17, 2012

24:

Not: [A-]

10. 24

24 is an American television series produced for the Fox network and syndicated worldwide, starring Kiefer Sutherland as Counter Terrorist Unit (CTU) agent Jack Bauer. Each 24-episode season covers 24 hours in the life of Bauer, using the real time method of narration. Premiering on November 6, 2001, the show spanned 192 episodes over eight seasons, with the series finale broadcast on May 24, 2010. In addition, the television film 24: Redemption was broadcast between seasons six and seven, while a feature film of the same name is also planned, with filming scheduled to begin in summer 2013.

Bauer is the only character to have appeared in every episode of the series. The series begins with his working for the Los Angeles–based Counter Terrorist Unit, in which he is a highly-proficient agent with an “ends justify the means” approach, regardless of the perceived morality of some of his actions. Throughout the series most of the main plot elements unfold like a political thriller. A typical plot has Bauer racing against the clock as he attempts to thwart multiple terrorist plots, including presidential assassination attempts, nuclear, biological and chemical threats, cyber attacks, as well as conspiracies which deal with government and corporate corruption.

Although critically acclaimed, the series has been criticized for its depictions of torture as effective and its negative depictions of Muslims. Nevertheless, the show won numerous awards over its eight seasons, including Best Drama Series at the 2003 Golden Globe Awards andOutstanding Drama Series at the 2006 Primetime Emmy Awards. At the conclusion of its eighth and final season, 24 became the longest-running espionage-themed television drama ever, surpassing both Mission: Impossible and The Avengers.

Premise

24 is a serial drama which stars Kiefer Sutherland as Jack Bauer, focusing on the efforts of the fictional Counter Terrorist Unit, and their efforts to protect America from terrorism plots. Each episode typically follows Bauer, officials in the U.S. government, and the conspirators behind the events of the day, often simultaneously. The episodes take place over the course of one hour, depicting events as they happen, in real time. To emphasize the real-world flow of events, a clock is prominently displayed on-screen during the show, and there is a regular use of split screens, a technique used to depict multiple scenes occurring at the same time.

24
The intertitle for the series, which shows the number 24 in orange text on a black background
Genre Serial drama
Political thriller
Action[1]
Created by Joel Surnow
Robert Cochran
Starring Kiefer Sutherland
Mary Lynn Rajskub
Carlos Bernard
Elisha Cuthbert
Dennis Haysbert
James Morrison
Reiko Aylesworth
Kim Raver
D. B. Woodside
Penny Johnson Jerald
Roger Cross
Gregory Itzin
Cherry Jones
Louis Lombardi
Annie Wersching
Sarah Clarke
and others
Composer(s) Sean Callery
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 8
No. of episodes 192 + 24: Redemption(List of episodes)
Production
Executiveproducer(s) Joel Surnow
Robert Cochran
Brian Grazer
Howard Gordon
Evan Katz
Kiefer Sutherland
Jon Cassar
Manny Coto
David Fury
Brad Turner
Brannon Braga
Alex Gansa
Chip Johannessen
Tony Krantz
Location(s) Los Angeles (seasons 1–6)
South Africa (Redemption)
Washington, D.C. (season 7)
New York City (season 8)
Running time 43 minutes
Productioncompany(s) Imagine Entertainment
20th Century Fox Television
Real Time Productions
Teakwood Lane Productions
Distributor 20th Television
Broadcast
Original channel Fox
Picture format NTSC 480i (SDTV)
PAL 576i (SDTV)
720p (HDTV) Fox HD
1080i (HDTV) Sky+ HD
Original run November 6, 2001 – May 24, 2010

Flashforward:

Not: [A-]

11.Flashforward

FlashForward is an American television series, adapted for TV by Brannon Braga and David S. Goyer, which aired for one season on ABCbetween September 24, 2009 and May 27, 2010. It is based on the 1999 novel Flashforward by Canadian science fiction writer Robert J. Sawyer. The series revolves around the lives of several people as a mysterious event causes nearly everyone on the planet to simultaneously lose consciousness for two minutes and seventeen seconds on October 6, 2009. During this “blackout”, people see what appears to be visions of their lives on April 29, 2010, a global “flashforward”. The original book explains a FF event that shows the world participants a view 21.5 years into the future, while the show shows a 6 month in the future FF event, probably coinciding with the shows first season enddate.

The ‘season finale’ was shot before it was known the show would be cancelled and showed another FF event happening 20+ years in the future, following the novel’s premise closely.

In May 2010, ABC announced that FlashForward had been cancelled.

Premise

FlashForward is constructed around a high concept narrative where a mysterious event has caused nearly everyone on the planet to simultaneously lose consciousness for 137 seconds, during which time people see what appears to be a vision of their own life approximately six months in the future: a global “flashforward”. A team of Los Angeles FBI agents, led by Stanford Wedeck (Vance) and spearheaded by Mark Benford (Fiennes) and his partner Demetri Noh (Cho), begin the process of determining what happened, why, and whether it will happen again. Benford contributes a unique perspective on the investigation; in his flashforward, he saw the results of six months of investigation that he had done on the flashforward event, and he and his team use those clues to recreate the investigation.

The team investigates a number of events related to the flashforward, including “Suspect Zero”, who did not lose consciousness during the event because of a quantum entanglement device (QED), the sinister “D. Gibbons/Dyson Frost”, and a similar mass loss of consciousness in Somalia many years earlier in 1991. Meanwhile, personal revelations contained within the flashforwards occupy the personal lives of the principal characters. Mark Benford sees himself relapsing into alcoholism; his wife sees herself with another man; Demetri Noh sees nothing, which could mean that he will not be alive to see the day everyone else has glimpsed or, perhaps, that his future wasn’t set on the day of the flashforward. Other characters grapple with similarly unexpected or surprising revelations in their flashforwards.

FlashForward
FlashForward2.JPG
Genre
Created by
Starring
Country of origin United States
United Kingdom
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 1
No. of episodes 22 (List of episodes)
Production
Executiveproducer(s)
Location(s) Los Angeles, California
Running time 42 minutes
Productioncompany(s) ABC Studios
Broadcast
Original channel ABC
Original run September 24, 2009 – May 27, 2010

Lost:

Not: [A-]

12.Lost

Lost is an American television series that was originally aired on the American Broadcasting Company (ABC) from September 22, 2004 to May 23, 2010, consisting of six seasons. Lost is a drama series containing elements of science fiction and the supernatural that follows the survivors of the crash of a commercial passenger jet flying between Sydney and Los Angeles, on a mysterious tropical island somewhere in the South Pacific Ocean. The story is told in a heavily serialized manner. Episodes typically feature a primary storyline on the island, as well as a secondary storyline from another point in a character’s life.

Lost was created by Jeffrey Lieber, J. J. Abrams and Damon Lindelof who share story-writing credits for the pilot episode, which Abrams directed. Throughout the show’s run, Lindelof and Carlton Cuse served as showrunners and head writers, working together with a large number of other executive producers and writers. Due to its large ensemble cast and the cost of filming primarily on location in Oahu, Hawaii, the series was one of the most expensive on television.[1] The fictional universe and mythology of Lost is expanded upon by a number of related media, most importantly a series of short mini-episodes called Missing Pieces, and a 12-minute epilogue titled “The New Man in Charge.”

A critically acclaimed and popular success, Lost was consistently ranked by critics on their lists of top ten series of all time. The first season garnered an average of 15.69 million viewers per episode on ABC. During its sixth and final season, the show averaged over 11 million U.S. viewers per episode. Lost was the recipient of hundreds of award nominations throughout its run, and won numerous industry awards, including theEmmy Award for Outstanding Drama Series in 2005, Best American Import at the British Academy Television Awards in 2005, the Golden Globe Award for Best Drama in 2006 and a Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Ensemble in a Drama Series.

Overview:

The first season begins with a plane crash that leaves the surviving passengers of Oceanic Airlines Flight 815 on what seems to be a deserted tropical island. Their survival is threatened by a number of mysterious entities, including polar bears, an unseen creature that roams the jungle (the “Smoke Monster”), and the island’s malevolent inhabitants known as “the Others”. They encounter a French woman named Danielle Rousseauwho was shipwrecked on the island 16 years before them and is desperate for news of someone called Alex. They also find a mysterious metal hatch buried in the ground. While two characters try to force the hatch open, four other survivors attempt to leave on a raft that they have constructed. Meanwhile, flashbacks centered on individual survivors detail their lives prior to the plane crash.

The second season follows the growing conflict between the survivors and the Others, and continues the theme of the clash between faith and science, while resolving old mysteries and posing new ones. A power struggle between Jack and John over control of the guns and medicine in the hatch develops, resolved in “The Long Con” by Sawyer when he gains control of them. New characters are introduced, including the tail-section survivors (the “Tailies”) and other island inhabitants. The hatch is revealed to be a research station built by the Dharma Initiative, a scientific research project that was conducting experiments on the island decades earlier. A man named Desmond Hume has been living in the hatch for three years, pushing a button every 108 minutes to prevent a catastrophic event from occurring. As the truth about the mysterious Others begins to unfold, one of the crash survivors betrays the other castaways, and the cause of the plane crash is revealed.

In the third season, the crash survivors learn more about the Others and their long history on the mysterious island. Desmond and one of the Others join the survivors while one of their number in turn defects to the Others. A war between the Others and the survivors comes to a head, and the survivors make contact with a rescue team aboard the freighter Kahana.

Season four focuses on the survivors dealing with the arrival of people from the freighter, who have been sent to the island not as part of a rescue operation, but for far more nefarious purposes. The survivors begin planning to leave the island before the freighter crew can carry out their plan. Flashforwards reveal the identities and future actions of the so-called “Oceanic Six,” a group of survivors who have escaped the island and returned to their normal lives. In an attempt to “move the island” to safety, one of the Others uses an ancient device on the island that not only moves the island physically but also moves it to another point in time, while simultaneously teleporting that Other to a desert in Tunisia.

The fifth season follows two timelines. The first takes place on the island where the survivors who were left behind erratically jump forward and backward through time until they are finally stranded with the Dharma Initiative in 1974. The second continues the original timeline, which takes place on the mainland after the Oceanic Six escape, and follows their return to the island on Ajira Airways flight 316 in 2007 (three years after they escaped). Some passengers on the Ajira flight land in 1977 and some remain in 2007. The ones who land in 1977 reunite with the other survivors who have lived for three years with the Dharma Initiative and attempt to change past events in order to prevent the Oceanic plane from crashing in the future.

In the sixth and final season, the main storyline follows the survivors, reunited in the present day. Following the demise of Jacob, the island’s protector, the survivors are up against the Man in Black, known previously as the Smoke Monster. A “flash-sideways” narrative also follows the lives of the main characters in a setting where Oceanic 815 never crashed. In the final episodes, aflashback to the distant past shows the origins of the island’s power and of the conflict between Jacob and the Man in Black, who are revealed to be twin brothers. One survivor becomes the successor to Jacob as caretaker of the island, and kills the Man in Black in a final showdown, with the island at stake. A small handful of survivors escape on the Ajira plane. It is implied that a few survivors return home later, while others remain living happily on the island. The series finale reveals that the flash-sideways timeline is actually a form of limbo, where some of the survivors and other characters from the island are reunited after having died because their time on the island had been the most important part of their existence. In the end, the survivors are all reunited in a church where they “move on” together.

Lost
The word "Lost" in white lettering on a black background.
Genre Adventure
Mystery
Serial drama
Science fiction
Supernatural
Created by Jeffrey Lieber
J. J. Abrams
Damon Lindelof
Written by Damon Lindelof (45 episodes)
Carlton Cuse (39 episodes)
Edward Kitsis (21 episodes)
Adam Horowitz (21 episodes)
Elizabeth Sarnoff (19 episodes)
and others
Directed by Jack Bender (42 episodes)
Stephen Williams (26 episodes)
and others
Starring see below
Composer(s) Michael Giacchino
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 6
No. of episodes 121 (List of episodes)
Production
Executiveproducer(s) J.J. Abrams
Damon Lindelof
Bryan Burk
Carlton Cuse
Jack Bender
Jeff Pinkner (season 3)
Stephen Williams (seasons 4–5)
Edward Kitsis (seasons 5–6)
Adam Horowitz (seasons 5–6)
Jean Higgins (season 6)
Elizabeth Sarnoff (season 6)
Location(s) OahuHawaii
Camera setup Single camera
Running time 40–48 minutes
Productioncompany(s) Bad Robot Productions
ABC Studios (as Touchstone Television 2004–2007)
Distributor Buena Vista Television
Broadcast
Original channel ABC
Picture format 480i (SDTV)
720p (HDTV) ABC HD
1080i (HDTV) Sky1 HD, Premiere HD, Seven HD
Original run September 22, 2004 – May 23, 2010

The Event:

Not: [C+]

13.Event

The Event (typographically stylized THE EVƎNT) is an American television series containing elements of science fiction, action/adventure andpolitical allegory. The show was created by Nick Wauters, and premiered on NBC on September 20, 2010. The plot centers on a group ofextraterrestrials, some of whom have been detained by the United States government for sixty-six years since their ship crashed in Alaska, while others have secretly assimilated among the general populace. The series was picked up for a full first season of 22 episodes on October 18, 2010. NBC canceled the series on May 13, 2011.

Overview

Near the end of World War II, a craft of undetermined origin crashed in the Brooks Range of northern Alaska. It carried passengers who appeared outwardly human, but were eventually determined to be of extraterrestrial origin. Their DNA is slightly less than one percent different from humans, and they age at a much slower rate. Since ninety-seven captured survivors refused to disclose information to the US, they were held in a nearby government facility, located on fictional Mount Inostranka. The remaining survivors, also known as the Sleepers, were able to escape the crash scene, as they, unlike those who were captured, sustained minor injuries. Those who escaped ended up hiding among the regular populace.

In the present day, President Martinez learns of the facility’s existence shortly after his inauguration and decides, after meeting the leader of the detainees, to release them and disclose their existence to the world, despite the objections of the intelligence agencies. His plans are put on hold when an assassination attempt on him is foiled by means beyond human technology. The CIA realizes there are other extraterrestrials and secretly plans to find and detain them. Unknown to the agency, the agent chosen to head the effort is himself one of those extraterrestrials. The escaped extraterrestrials, upon learning of the CIA’s plans, have mixed reactions: some want to try to salvage attempts to peacefully assimilate, while others want to fight against the populace.

Caught in the middle of these events is Sean Walker, whose plans to propose to his girlfriend Leila on a Caribbean cruise are cut short when she mysteriously disappears from the ship. His investigation eventually leads him to uncover the assassination plot.

The Event
The Event 2010 Intertitle.svg
Genre
Created by Nick Wauters
Starring
Composer(s) Scott Starrett
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 1
No. of episodes 22 (List of episodes)
Production
Executiveproducer(s)
Running time 43 minutes
Productioncompany(s)
Broadcast
Original channel NBC
Original run September 20, 2010 – May 23, 2011

The Lost Room:

Not: [A-]

14.The Lost Room

The Lost Room is a 2006 science fiction television miniseries that aired on the Sci Fi Channel in the United States. The series revolves around the titular room and some of the everyday items from that room which possess unusual powers. The show’s protagonist, Joe Miller, is searching for these objects to rescue his daughter, Anna, who has disappeared inside the Room. Once a typical room at a 1960s motel along U.S. Route 66, the Lost Room has existed outside of normal time and space since 1961, when what is only referred to as “the Event” took place.

The Room

The Room is the nonexistent Room 10 at the abandoned Sunshine Motel outside of Gallup, New Mexico. At 1:20:44 p.m. on May 4, 1961, something happened at the site of the Room that erased it and all its contents. This is referred to as “the Event” or “the Incident”, and is thought to be the reason for the unusual properties of the Room and the Objects from within it. At the time of the Event, the motel was in serviceable condition, but after the event no-one remembers that a tenth room ever existed. One of the Objects, the undeveloped Polaroid picture, allows a person to view the tenth room as it was at the time of the Event by standing at its current vacant location at the Sunshine Motel ruins.

The Room can be accessed only by whoever has the Key. The Key will open any hinged door with a pin tumbler lock anywhere in the world, turning the door into a portal accessing the Room regardless of where that door would normally open. As Joe Miller sees on the surveillance tape, when a door is opened using the key, it appears closed if viewed from the other side of that door. When exiting the Room the door opens not necessarily to the original place of entry, but to any room the holder of the Key has in mind, or to a random room if the user does not focus. To reach a specific room the user must have a clear picture of the room’s door and the area around it. The “Lost” Room thus serves as a means of instant travel between similar doors anywhere on Earth. Hinged doors with types of locks other than a tumbler lock or with no lock at all, sliding doors and rotating doors cannot be used to access the Room. The door used does not have to be installed in a wall and can be a smaller prop door or a freestanding doorway, the only important elements are the lock and that it is a hinged door.

Any time the door is closed with the key outside the room, the Room “resets”: everything that is not an Object disappears, including people. Multiple people can enter the room at once, but they must exit the room when the Key does. When the Room resets, any Objects in the Room will return to their original position at the time of the Event. A benefit of this is that an Object enclosed within something else, such as a safe, may be retrieved by leaving it inside and resetting the room. This can also be use to distinguish real Objects from fakes, since fakes will disappear.

Objects, when outside the Room, possess special powers and are indestructible. When inside the Room, Objects lose their special properties and can be destroyed. According to the Occupant, a new Object will take the destroyed Object’s place, a phenomenon he refers to as the Law of Conservation of Objects. The Occupant states that there are many Rooms, and so any non-Object left in the Room is not erased, but exists in a different instance of the Room. The reset, in turn, represents a confluence of these Rooms, allowing the Occupant (the only Object capable of consciousness) to retrieve things lost during a reset, provided he has a clear idea of what he wishes to retrieve.

The Event

The Event is a shorthand term given to the moment in time that the Lost Room was created. It occurred at 1:20:44 p.m. on May 4, 1961, and erased the room and all of its contents from history. The reason behind this and the ultimate purpose of the Objects is unknown, though two primary hypotheses have been postulated. Even the man occupying the room at the time of the event doesn’t seem to know what happened, so the truth remains a mystery. Both hypotheses essentially lead to the same conclusion, but attribute the event to different causes.

One faction, the Order of the Reunification, operates under the belief that the Objects are pieces of God’s mind or body (God having presumably died or been killed somehow) and that reuniting them will allow them to communicate with God. More extreme versions of this view hold that reuniting the Objects will turn one into God or at least give that person God-like powers. Martin Ruber purports that the Occupant confirmed this particular theory for him in a vision, making him the self-proclaimed “Prophet of the Objects”, but his near-death state from dehydration and heat exhaustion at the time casts doubt on his claims. Additionally, the Occupant himself shows no knowledge of the circumstances behind the event. The Deck of Cards, which gives one who is exposed to it a vision of the events during the Collectors’ failed attempt to use the objects on Room 9 of the hotel, may be the source of their beliefs, as it is used in their rituals.

Another (though not necessarily contradictory) view of the phenomenon suggests that reality was somehow shattered at the location of the Room, thus separating it and everything in it from time and giving its contents metaphysical abilities. Should the items be collected and returned to the room by an individual, that person would then have complete control over reality. This theory works under the assumption that the one gathering the objects has the knowledge to utilize them properly. Since the Objects are just considered tools, they would do no good if the user were unaware of their paranormal functions.

The Objects

The Objects are powerful artifacts and consist of roughly 100 everyday items one would expect to find in an occupied motel room in the 1960s. They are indestructible (except when inside the Room) and possess various other-worldly powers when taken outside the Lost Room, but do not work within the Room itself. According to the Occupant (Eddie McCleister), when an object is destroyed within the room, another object takes its place. Whether the new object takes the former’s properties partially or totally is unknown. Various characters repeatedly put forth the opinion that, over time, Objects lead to something akin to bad karma or bad luck for their owners. All of the items (including the occupant) attract to one another, wanting to come together. The Occupant states that the objects are aware of each other, constantly sending out pings to each other and that for a living mind this is torture.

The Cabals

Many Object-seekers have organized themselves into groups, known as “cabals”. Wars between cabals are mentioned in the series. There are at least three cabals:

The Collectors 
The original group of Object-seekers formed some time after the Event. Led by Arlene Conroy, the manager of the Sunshine Motel, most of the Collectors were killed or driven insane after the disaster in Room 9 in 1966. The survivors hid their most important Objects in a place called “The Collector’s Vault”, buried in a fallout shelter beneath an abandoned prison.
The Legion 
A cabal dedicated to collecting the Objects and stopping them from causing more harm. They claim to follow an established set of rules, including that they never kill in order to acquire the Objects, although this rule is sometimes put to the test.
The Order of the Reunification 
Also referred to as “The Order” or “The New Religion”. They believe that the Objects are pieces of God and must be reunited. Once so restored, members of the Order would be able to communicate with God for the first time in human history. Unlike the Legion, The Order have no qualms about killing.
The Lost Room

The Lost Room‘s DVD cover
Genre
Creator
Produced by
  • Richard Hatem
  • Christopher Leone
  • Laura Harkcom
  • Paul Workman
  • Peter Chomsky
  • Bill Hill
  • Paul Kurta
Starring
Country United States
Language English
Original channel Sci Fi Channel
Original run December 11, 2006 – December 13, 2006
Running time 284 minutes
No. of episodes 6

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